Which side makes a better case?
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  • a year ago

    There are indeed some words that will be difficult to be used for good.. Let me give you my favorite back from my days in London: CUNT! lol Give me an example of how this word can be used in a good way :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

    • a year ago

      @gigi @metant3's name in my phone is "Sweet Cunt".

      The point is, words in and of themselves cannot be good or bad, because they are inanimate objects. It's how we use them that is good or bad. Since culture has decided that certain words are "bad words" the common usage of those words will often be used with negative intent. But it doesn't have to be that way.

      We know that culture is often wrong. We know that the meaning of words changes over time. We know that there are a multitude of different languages all of which have different interpretations of words. We know that words can be used with the exact opposite of their dictionary definition to communicate a certain message. Communication is so much more than just picking good or bad words. Communication is about what message you are trying to impart to someone, and then how you go about doing that.

      There's nothing in humanity or morality that would make words be inherently good or bad. It's how we use those words that is good or bad :).

    • a year ago

      @debateme13
      LOL is that really what I am in your phone? Screw you hahahaha you're about to get a new name in mine.

    • a year ago

      @debateme13 I think I agree with you to be honest. And I'm a big fan of using "inappropriate" words. Cunt especially in the UK is probably the worst thing you can say to anyone but for some reason I love the way it sounds lol
      "Sweet Cunt" is even better so I'm stealing it!

  • a year ago

    "You fecal matter"... that's hilarious @debateme13

    I'm think I'm going to start swearing like that from now on... "damn you, offspring of a polygamous woman"

    I feel like British people have a more polite and literal way of swearing, which is far more effective than crude language and profanity

    • a year ago

      @yaz British are brilliant.. they look at you, speak to you with this posh accent and you don't even realize that they insulted you! @bookman back me up here! British black humor and swearing is the best! :-)

    • a year ago

      @gigi agreed 100%, i would be far more insulted by a British literal description of my inadequacies rather than profane f-word-based swearing..

      "you incompetent imbecile who seems to have been left behind in the process of evolution and therefore remained to exist as a dumb ape"

      is far more effective than

      "you mother fucker son of a bitch piece of shit"

    • a year ago

      @yaz :rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:

    • a year ago

      @gigi lol. Hey how would I know? I NEVER insult people :-) Actually you're right, it's all about subtlety, a few people spring to mind to were/are experts at the craft: Oscar Wilde (although he was Irish...which is kind of British), Stephen Fry, and of course The Bard himself William Shakespeare....

    • a year ago

      @yaz That's absolutely true. The words in and of themselves are not what makes a message. It's the intent of the communication that makes your sentence have meaning, so you could use "good words" to communicate your negative message just as much (and sometimes better) than you could use "bad words".

      Also, George Carlin, because he's a legend :). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mUvdXxhLPa8

  • a year ago

    @debateme13 let me give you an example of why I disagree with you.

    The word I want to highlight is "Nigger".

    If I walked down the street and at a public bench when no one was around and saw the word on a piece of pink paper with hearts, I would be just as bothered as if it was being said to me by a guy in a white hood standing in front of a burning cross.

    Regardless of how that word was used in a nice way or in bad way the words meaning can not be changed. That is a "Bad Word" no if's and's or but's.

    • a year ago

      @the_peoples_champ But you just used the word. Did you just commit a moral evil? Have you ever heard the song Niggas in Paris? Did I just commit a moral evil by quoting the name of that song?

      I hear a lot of black people greet each other saying "what's up nigga!?" Are they committing an inherent moral evil just by using that sound? I don't think so. The problem isn't the sound itself. The problem would be if one uses the word with the intent of being disparaging against an African American. But you could communicate that same negative intent with or without that word. Culture has just decided that the usual way of expressing distaste toward those with darker skin is the sound that comes when you put the sound nig with the sound er. There's no reason for it.

      The word itself is nothing but a sound. But it's the negative meaning we associate with the word that is a problem. If someone is intentionally trying to communicate a pejorative for a black person, that is a problem. But the sound that occurs when we put a couple of letters together is not a good or bad thing in and of itself.

    • a year ago

      @debateme13

      1. I didn't do a moral wrong because I put it in quotation marks to show I was only using it to make a point.

      2. Yes you did commit a moral evil by quoting the name of the song. If you don't believe me, you go sing that song in front of an older black woman. If you feel that you can sing/rap that entire song with feeling that you owe her an apology for using that word, you will have proven your point and disproved mine. Or play the song at your desk at work loudly. If you can do that without feeling the need to apologize to those around you, you will have made your point and disproven mine.

      3. Words have meaning. Those meanings can be negative or positive. You can't debate whether or not words have meaning, because even in 3rd grade school books they are taught to "define" words. Teaching children at the youngest age that "words have meaning".

    • a year ago

      @the_peoples_champ Maybe you should watch the debate. I don't think you actually know my perspective even though it was said during the debate.

  • a year ago

    Here's an example (tongue in cheek, but also true) how CUNT can be used in a very neutral way. The University of Colorado football team's rosters lists John Jones as CUNT. It'a an acronym meaning "Colorado University Nose Tackle."