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  • a year ago

    Certainly hope this is not true.. which society you are referring to?

  • a year ago

    I'm inclined to agree, although I'm not sure what exactly you mean. Would you be able to clarify how you see this happening in today's society?

  • a year ago

    Can you provide some logical evidence that backs up your point?

    Yes, racism is still a thing in the country, and I believe it's evil. Racism is a problem that will most likely never end. Some people are racists towards specific ethnic backgrounds or skin color and that is something that will most likely never end, however, that doesn't mean it can't get better. I am just asking for some examples that prompted you to debate that black people are unaccepted in society, because, I don't fully agree that blacks are "unaccepted".

    • a year ago

      For all the problems we still face today, we're MILES ahead of where we were about half a century ago. There's still work to be done but don't dismiss how far we've come.

      • a year ago

        Okay. Here in California, to become a hair stylist you must learn how to do ALL hair (although most hair types have a similarity to them, there are differences) at a regular old any day beautician school. However, you must attend a whole different school to learn about black hair. Do you understand what that means for the middle class black? That means that if you want to get your hair done at the Brix or some really upscale salon (where they MAY be a higher number of whites) you can't because they didn't pay the extra fees to learn how to do your hair. These schools are not teaching beauticians ANYTHING about black hair (let alone black culture) therefore making it impossible to TRULY stay out of what we refer to as the "ghetto". I live in Auburn, CA, but I'm from Sacramento, CA. Sacramento is ghetto, but Auburn is a middle classed area and offers pretty much everything I need, but what I want? Not so much. I can't find my skin color for my makeup. No salon in the area knows how to do my hair. So what do I do? I drive 33 miles to Sacramento to get all of my products and I come back here. Now I know that may not seem like a big deal to you, but it is to black people.

        • a year ago

          @ayanahale1998 Not sure if this is evidence that blacks are not accepted in America.. The US is a capitalistic market hence for profit institutions will be driven by exactly that i.e. if there is a big enough market and $ value, they will go after it

        • a year ago

          @ayanahale1998 This isn't necessarily justifiable evidence that black people are unaccepted in America today. There are different schools that teach about black hair than non-black hair but this isn't a form of racism that proves your point.

        • a year ago

          @gigi It's proof that our "type" is not considered NORMAL.

        • a year ago

          @alecb1202 It is. Do you take your kids to a completely different school to learn about african american history?

        • a year ago

          Why is it SEPARATE? Because we are not considered to be in the same CLASS.

        • a year ago

          @gigi And I totally understand the capitalistic standpoint. But if you don't teach about me or my people, how are we ever supposed to be understood?

        • a year ago

          @ayanahale1998 If you are referring to history and culture, I completely agree with you that the role of the black communities is significant and should definitely be taught along with the rest (I assume it is?).
          Regarding businesses, it's just a pure supply - demand and profitability game. I've lived in London and if you visit areas where black/ asian/ muslim communities are strong, you will find relevant local businesses which are thriving! (in fact it will be difficult to find a hairdresser for the caucasians..)
          I only spent the last 2 years in the US and I have met a number of brilliant black entrepreneurs who are developing successful businesses and products targeting the black communities so I hope that there is a shift

      • a year ago

        Sometimes yes, sometimes no. There are still a lot of soft barriers out there, and probably a few hard ones. I'm not really in a good position to judge, and I'm not sure where to draw the dividing line between accepted and not. The official word is, yes, of course, the unofficial word is no, not completely.