4 years ago
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  • 4 years ago

    I think it should be left to them whether or not they want to pursue their educations. For athletes likely to go professional, many don't graduate and many of those that do take very light classes because they need to spend so much time on their sport anyway. By the time they get to college, these athletes generally have a good idea of how far they can go in a sport, and whether or not it makes sense to them to take classes.

    A side benefit is this reduces the often arbitrary and unfair role of the NCAA in sanctioning teams, which I think everyone is a fan of

    • 4 years ago

      They are attending the college after all. Maybe they can major in their sport and then take like a minimal amount of classes. Basic Math, Science, History...

      • 4 years ago

        Majoring in their sport is actually a really cool idea.

      • 4 years ago

        I agree that a "basketball major" etc. would be a very cool idea, but then sports requirements would turn into academic requirements. So it's not that athletes wouldn't have academic requirements, they would just have academic requirements which center around sports.

      • 4 years ago

        BSKT 201 - "Fundamentals of Dribbling"

      • 4 years ago

        This is a sweet idea, especially considering most athletes going pro spend more time on their sport than their major already anyway. My only concern is that a "degree in basketball" might not have sufficient value to justify having it whatsoever.

      • 4 years ago

        Maybe throw in some business-type courses, so that people who don't hit it big can open up basketball camps, run a coaching business, etc.

        I think there are schools that do this for professional tennis and golf: they teach you to improve at the sport, but they also teach you how to create and run a business based on the sport.

      • 4 years ago

        This sounds like a double major of [sport] and sport's management. It would definitely be interesting to see how feasible this is! Practices could count as class credit, kind of like how acting majors have studio time. 

    • 4 years ago

      The students are not fairly compensated by their colleges, academic requirements are the only thing the majority can fall back on.

      • 4 years ago

        Obviously for a lot of them, it'll make sense to take classes. I'm just saying that it should be their choice, so d1 athletes that are leaving school after a year anyway don't have to.

      • 4 years ago

        The D1 system needs a major overhaul IMO, but taking out the minor inconvenience for the few stars that are planning to go major after 1 year would be a mistake. 
        Those special cases generally get special treatment in class along with easier schedules.  
        Generally speaking the athletes come from lower income neighborhoods and need protection. 

      • 4 years ago

        The fact that they get special treatment already is exactly the problem, they're being forced to take these classes that provide no real value to them.  Requiring them to take classes with the full understanding that these classes won't be rigorous at all is probably not the ideal solution.
        How does the protection stuff play in here?

      • 4 years ago

        No one is forcing anything on them, they are in an agreement with the college and collegiate sports association that governs. 
        Protect comes into play when uneducated kids risk injury without monetary gain, and under your proposal no degree either. 
        If you suggest some sort of Junior Professional Leagues, now that is something I would agree with. 

      • 4 years ago

        Realistically, most athletes aiming to go pro hurt their chances a lot if they don't go to college, so this is, if not their only option, definetely their best option.  
        The protection thing does make sense in theory, but I dont think matters in practice because:
        1) A lot of them don't end up getting the degree anyway, and
        2) A lot of the degrees that they do get are in "fluff" majors and classes specifically designed to have light workloads that athletes can complete.

      • 4 years ago

        NCAA boasts a 86% graduation rate. Changing the system for the select few that get to go on to be professional seems bizarre to me.
        Again if the players could be compensated in other ways then I would agree with you. Free classes are the best compensation the players are getting so it should be maintained. 

      • 4 years ago

        This isn't fundamentally changing the system, since the vast majority of people will still opt to take classes.  Just because they are getting free classes doesn't mean that the classes are beneficial or that they even want the classes.  I also think they should get paid as well, but they shouldn't be required to take useless classes just so the NCAA can pretend they're being compensated.

    • 4 years ago

      As a college athlete, I completely agree with this statement!

      • 4 years ago

        I believe that if the rest of students must take a class, such as a mandatory seminar, the college athletes should take it too. The rest should be up to the athlete. 

        • 3 years ago

          If there's no academic requirements, what the heck are you doing at a college, anyway?